coaching process

Motivational goals have a goldilocks quality, whereby the targets that we aim for cannot be too easy, too hard, or take too long to achieve. The coach needs to get it just right.
It is important to have a firm understanding of not only how to implement a training plan, but also how to track and change it over time.
The box gym world needs a reset and there's no better time than now.
As coaches, we learn best when we expose ourselves to different perspectives and challenges.
A training cycle, like a story, has a beginning, middle, and end, and each has elements that are necessary for it to work.
Take some time to see how training methods and philosophies play out over time, but always plan to reevaluate again and again.
Let your ego go, apologize when appropriate, and practice often.
Improvement only comes from letting go of focus on outcomes and learning to experience the sense of flow that drives quality.
A large percentage of the population sabotage themselves for fear of success, the fear of being good and some have just lost motivation.
Coming to the gym shouldn’t feel like a chore or punishment, but understand that progression takes many forms.
Odds are that whether you tend to favor bilateral or unilateral exercises, you need to be doing more of what you're neglecting.
Your success as a coach is defined by the growth you can spur in your athletes.
Your programming goal should be to intelligently lay out a plan that offers a safe, long-term approach that develops the maximum potential of your athletes.
Read the evidence, but don’t ignore what works.
You need to develop a sound approach to programming and design a productive, safe, efficient strength and conditioning program.
Volunteer hours will mold you into the coach and trainer you want to become, so take every opportunity to learn from others.
Coaches must negotiate a difficult balancing act between objectivity and subjectivity.