rest and recovery

The tricky part of getting back in the game after a muscle strain is to keep your injury site at rest while still keeping your body active.
Simply, it is not the key to changing your tissues to improve your range of motion and movement quality in the long-term.
By selecting exercises to build maximal strength, while limiting unnecessary risk of injury, you can build a bulletproof body that will perform as well as it looks.
Smart training is being able to avoid burnout and knowing your body well enough to listen and back off when needed.
Push yourself with what you have as opposed to always trying to pile more on top of things that aren’t working already.
Be safe, be proactive, and stay active.
Find a coach, step into the weight room, and fuel your body to become an even better athlete than you were before your injury.
Training is a necessary stressor to create a need for improvement or adaptation.
Correct your movement patterns to gain strength.
Comparing HIIT and LISS is a pointless exercise, just know when the time is right for either in a balanced program.
Imagine what sort of training, if any, takes place with low self-worth, self-defeating thoughts, and fear? Imagine recovery without either.
Strength training is still quite new to many older individuals. We need to change that.
Have you ever shown up for a workout and aren't feeling it? What do you do? How do you make adjustments? Intuitively. That's how.
The clear majority of injuries could have been prevented if only a few simple habits were changed.
With everything you are going through physically and mentally, the last thing you need is a trainer who isn’t being considerate of the new realities you're facing.
There's more information available concerning warming up for workouts over cooling down afterward. Time to change the conversation.
There is no need to panic, but let’s get serious. The season is right around the corner and with it comes academic rigor, practice, film, training, and treatment. All stress is cumulative.