training plan

The tricky part of getting back in the game after a muscle strain is to keep your injury site at rest while still keeping your body active.
Get creative. Dumbbells and kettlebells are a great way to train your limbs independently and make sure you're not developing a "strong" side or a "weak" side.
They say the carryover for the benefits of HIIT is up to 39 hours after one session of training, something none of us can afford to miss.
Make sure you understand your "why" and then be sure the work you’re doing will get you there.
Whether athlete or layman, this is why we all train—to raise our ceiling. To have more move options in your life.
Failure is hardly the worst thing that could happen.
Don’t shy away from kettlebells. They are a unique way to train, adding a ton of instability while making you have to correct and stabilize your form in order to grow stronger.
If you are stuck, maybe you don't need to train like a pro bodybuilder or think that you might be one.
Want a higher peak? Then stop training only at the peak, and start developing your base.
By selecting exercises to build maximal strength, while limiting unnecessary risk of injury, you can build a bulletproof body that will perform as well as it looks.
Smart training is being able to avoid burnout and knowing your body well enough to listen and back off when needed.
Push yourself with what you have as opposed to always trying to pile more on top of things that aren’t working already.
It’s important to ensure we are respecting our bodies and our minds by setting up realistic expectations in our training.
In the grand scheme of things consistency always wins over perfection.
We all have mountains to move in order to grow and because of that we grind hard in the gym and sometimes treat it as therapy.
Trainers should practice empathy, learn about what the client's dreams and goals are, dig deeper, and find their real why.
If you stop having an emotional relationship with your style of training, then you’ll achieve more success.