Welcome to my four part video series of Primal Move workouts. Primal Move is an approach to human movement that prioritizes basic, natural movement. Through movements we learned as a baby we can help our bodies gain flexibility, repair and prevent injury, and build strength and skills. You can read more about it in my article about what primal movement is and why you need it.

 

If you missed the other segments:

Primal Move Workout #2 - Mobility & Crawling

Primal Move Workout #3 - Mirroring & Interaction

Primal Move Workout #4 - Putting It All Together

 

So, let’s do our first Primal Move workout:

  1. The beginning of each Primal Charge session is a self-evaluation using what is called the Primal Flow Evaluation. 
  2. As described we begin with ankle dorsiflexion and ankle mobility. The foot is the first contact point for all movement and if we don’t have a mobile ankle, following Boyle and Cook’s joint-by-joint approach, then all the rest of our movement will be flawed.
  3. Then we check active straight leg raise. Following the FMS protocol the ASLR corrections would be among the first things we chased when looking to improve movement, even in complex tasks such as squatting.
  4. Then we move to some simple rolling – the Happy Baby series. Rolling is one of our first movement patterns and drives many of our other activities.
  5. Moving to Figure 4 we swap from side to side and then into two different lunge positions. This allows us to continue checking our ankle mobility and then thoracic spine mobility.
  6. Then transitioning into a rocking movement. Rocking is another one of our earliest movements and can be used to check ankle, knee, and hip flexion. If you cannot achieve a deep rocking position how do you think you’ll be able to squat full depth? (Just rotate the rocking position ninety degrees to see that it is the bottom of the squat).
  7. The push up clock walk to the front helps us check linear stability; just as the trunk stability push up would in the FMS test.
  8. Crawling is another very early movement pattern and creates an important X in our body. Walking and running are both born from this X pattern and an inability to crawl in this contralateral fashion might cause problems when involved in more complex tasks. (And if you ever want to see something funny ask a lifelong cyclist to give it a try).
  9. The introduction of low-level plyometric movement is useful before adding full-scale rebounding or high intensity plyometric or strength work.
  10. A good squat is a sign of a body being ready to train. Gray Cook says that someone hitting a good solid deep squat in the FMS lets him know how the rest of the screen will go usually. The movement in and out of the push up activates the muscles of the core, which in turn allows better squatting. The bridging at the back of the movement is good for thoracic extension, which is also helpful for a strong squat position.
  11. Finally, the body responds to movement by moving better. Modern fitness is tied into do X for Y and often all of it standing in one spot. Movement occurs in all three planes and a good warm up gets you both moving and thinking in all directions so your body is truly warmed up for more intense efforts. Engaging the brain is an important element of Primal Move and you’ll see more of this in the coming short workouts.

 

If you missed the other segments:

Primal Move Workout #2 - Mobility & Crawling

Primal Move Workout #3 - Mirroring & Interaction

Primal Move Workout #4 - Putting It All Together

Topic:  Bodyweight & Gymnastics