body image

Every Sunday we post the "Sunday Seven" so you can quickly see the seven most popular articles of the week. This week: female body image, why fascia matters, programming for CrossFit, and more!
Why is there a subculture of skinny-hawking bikini-body programming starting to creep up at CrossFit boxes? I happened upon a box’s website the other day and found this: 2013 BIKINI CHALLENGE.
When I first heard the saying “strong is the new skinny” I loved it, but since then, I’ve kind of grown to hate it. Let me explain.
For years I struggled to get my butt exactly the way I wanted it to be. But now that has changed. I'm happy with my butt - and my body - just the way it is right now and in the future, and here's why.
Cheryl Nasso competed in the 2011 CrossFit Games, but for decades before she struggled with a life-threatening eating disorder. She credits the discovery of CrossFit for changing everything.
While girls typically worry about being too fat or too big, men are preoccupied with not being muscular enough - and sometimes feel the pressure to resort to steroids.
Don’t you dare call me petite, or skinny for that matter. I never liked hearing I was (or am) skinny. Skinny is for girls and lattes, not manly men.
Every Sunday we post the "Sunday Seven" so you can quickly see the 7 most popular articles of the week. This week: female body image, masters athletes, lower back pain, yoga and more!
As a coach I was blessed with a genetic predisposition for packing on muscle and sometimes inadvertently frightening female prospects. So my jacket became my tool for initiating women into the gym.
Every Sunday we post the "Sunday Seven" so you can quickly see the 7 most popular articles of the week. This week: female athletes and the scale, squats, mobility, and more!
If I told you I weighed 144lbs would you believe me? Do you even know what 144lbs of female athlete looks like? It's time to get real about what real weights look like.
I have a secret. It’s one I’ve been trying to cover it up since I was thirteen. I felt that my secret would lead people to believe I was fat, lazy, gross, and unattractive. Do you share my secret?
For over a decade I battled with my body, trying to make it look how I wanted, how the women in the magazines did. Then one day I discovered the power of my body and finally called a truce.
There is an epidemic destroying our nutrition and fitness goals. It's not a disease or a food - it's a mindset. It is unrealistic expectations and an obsession with perfection. Here's how to cure it.
Every Sunday we post the "Sunday Seven" so you can quickly see the 7 most popular articles of the week. This week's hot topics: women and IF, chiropractic, adolescents and weight lifting, and more!
I am not my deadlift. I am not my front squat. I am not my body weight or my body fat. These things are just measurements and they do not define my worth, or anyone else's.