strength and conditioning

Memorial Day is right around the corner, and that means Murph is, too.
Twelve reader favorites from the past week and from the archives, curated to save you time and bring you happiness.
Programming for yourself isn’t necessarily easy, but it’s not rocket science either. Here's my advice.
Just because you're over forty doesn't mean you can't still train hard. But you will need to make a few adjustments.
Don’t get locked into one manner of movement or style of training. See where your second choice leads you.
This strategy will flat out make you strong, even beyond the walls of the weight room.
The goal of Functional Mass Gain is to put on size, but also get stronger, stay agile, stay fast, stay flexible, and maintain mobility.
The latest lawsuit creates a negative association for people not familiar with CrossFit.
Sled training improves conditioning and is great for athlete-specific programming. And it's a lot of fun.
Revisit the basics of training to get your progress back on track.
Ditch the barbells and dumbbells for a few workouts to experience the unique challenges and benefits of sandbag training.
Appropriate programming is key to seeing progress in your numbers. Here's how to find it.
The body will respond to anything you throw at it, but the kettlebell is a unique beast that requires high technique and low complexity.
Focus on movement, remember to schedule playtime, and don't be afraid to occasionally fail - these are some of the keys to strength gain success.
Training can help us discover our inner strengths, cope with adversity, and use these strengths for greater purpose.
A new study suggests block periodization can help special operators avoid overtraining.
This is not another fancy deadlift program. This is real world advice about what you need to get results.