technique

When it comes to modes of lifting, our differences are not as significant as our similarities.
When it comes to weight training, I see too many white belts practicing black belt techniques.
Using orthoses is a great way to reinforce what the correct positions are, even when you’re not standing there making corrections.
Handstands are doable, but not easy - the only way you’ll get better at them is to keep trying.
There are big strength, speed, explosiveness, and coordination components to practicing this old-time strongman movement.
You can learn anything in the world at the click of a mouse, but weightlifting should not be one of those things.
There is always room to improve on the kettlebell swing. Take the first step by checking if you are making any of these mistakes.
Tangible numbers are not the only indicators of progress and you, as a coach, need to know why.
Mastering the tuck pop up will develop the strength and coordination required to complete a muscle up.
Learn about strength, conditioning, injury, longevity, and mentality in BJJ in our most read articles.
In a competition, it is often the psychological stress that will defeat you, not strength.
In BJJ, a competitor does not need to be as strong as possible. A competitor needs to be strong for his or her body weight.
As a smaller person, one of your biggest strengths is your speed and ability to exploit the holes in the game of your opponent.
Is there any case for only concentrating on your strong points? I am going to say, “Yes."
The undisputed truths all good coaches know and with which all good keyboard warriors can arm themselves in their never-ending debates.
You’ll learn a better feel for what your hand does in the water and how to grab a better hold on the water with each stroke.
Are you making mistakes or missing elements in your training and coaching that you're not even aware of? Not after you read this article!