Bob Takano is a highly regarded weightlifting coach who was inducted into the USA Weightlifting Hall of Fame in 2007 for his contributions to coaching. His experience in coaching all levels of lifter from beginners to national champions is both vast and deep. Here are nine of his articles and videos for you to learn from and enjoy.
 
weighlifting, olympic weightlifting, snatch
Breaking Muscle Shop
For decades I’ve been hearing the complaints about technique coaching and training the snatch and clean and jerk. Here's why you need technique and there's no excuse for skipping over it.
 
We are at an interesting period where is a swelling of interest in the Olympic lifts, but trainees lack a proper physical education. For new weightlifting coaches, the game has forever changed.
 
An important ratio for a weightlifter to know is the ratio of the snatch to the clean and jerk. I'm going to tell you why it's important and how to make appropriate training adjustments.
 

Breaking Muscle Video: Bob Takano - The Weighted Ankle Stretch

The following exercise employs the weight of a barbell to increase the stress on the achilles tendon.

 
Although most people understand the relevance of anatomy and physiology, few people understand the process of scientific reasoning that may be the most valuable tool that can be applied to coaching.
 
The shift from the pull to the knees to the power position is one of the most difficult aspects of coaching technique. Here's a simple exercise to teach the feeling of this movement.
 
Although most people understand the relevance of anatomy and physiology, few people understand the process of scientific reasoning that may be the most valuable tool that can be applied to coaching.
 
Check out this short video of a new lifter snatching with 104 kg. If you watch carefully, you'll see his mistake - which Bob Takano calls "the dirty bop."
 
To be a good weightlifting coach you must understand the full scope of what you are coaching, and the order in which to address it. I'm going to break it down, component by component, and show you.
 
Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.
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