Many athletes deal with shoulder pain at one point or another. But how do you minimize the chances of this happening to you? And what is the best course of action if you do incur a shoulder injury? Read these ten articles to help you work it all out.

Let's take a close look at all the potential movements we can execute with the shoulder joint. Then, let's look at how we can strengthen the joint and girdle to protect ourselves from injury.
Breaking Muscle Shop
Many of us internally rotate our arms all day long while we work. Sadly, this exact positioning is a set up for a shoulder impingement or rotator cuff or labrum tear down the road.
Most athletes deal with shoulder pain at one point or another. The root cause for most of them is shoulder instability. But what causes instability and how can you fix it?
By correcting your mechanics and teaching your body how to move more efficiently, you’ll quit f’ing up your shoulder and start f’ing up WODs.
Reality is most of us are messed up in some way and there are just some things we shouldn’t do. But there’s always a way to work around a problem, avoid injury, and keep edging our way forward
A decrease in scapular control places the glenohumeral joint at a mechanical disadvantage, and bigger muscles start to compensate for the smaller ones getting no love. Result? Shoulder pain.
Communicating with doctors can be frustrating and overwhelming. Here are outlined questions you should ask your physician when you have a shoulder injury, to get the best quality treatment.
As a health practitioner, the two most common injuries I see are shoulder and low back injuries. Here is my advice for how to handle and heal from these common athletic injuries.
Science takes a look at rotator cuff injuries and gives advice on how to treat them. While some rehab is recommended, conservative treatment is not the most effective option, according to researchers.
How often have we heard or said the words, "I have a shoulder issue." Here are some tips for releasing your shoulder issues, including a yoga pose for healing and stretching.
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