clean and jerk

Yes, the snatch is a tremendous full-body lift, and yes, it displays great strength and athleticism. But why are you trying to do it so much? Do you know how little the Russians actually did it?
The dip in the jerk seems straightforward enough (straight down, actually). Bend your knees, and straighten them vigorously. But like many simple things there's more than meets the eye.
Here is an analysis of the current world records across all age categories. I wanted to see how consistent percentages of snatch to clean and jerk were across weight and sex categories.
Take a look at this exquisite slow motion replay of Liao Hui's world record breaking 198kg clean and jerk at the 2013 World Weightlifting Championships.
The clean ends with the bar racked on your shoulders, whereas the jerk starts from there. Even so, many lifters find the need to readjust the position of their rack. Why is this?
Bob Takano is a highly regarded weightlifting coach with experience in coaching all levels of lifter from beginners to national champion. Here are nine of his articles and videos for you.
Just as in the clean, we now have another opportunity to take advantage of the springiness of the bar in order to complete the lift. Here's how you do it.
This is about one of the tricks of the trade used by elite lifters that might be of use to those of you cleaning substantial weight in the squat style. This technique is called "catching the bounce."
As with my discussion last week about the press-jerk confusion there is also much of the same with the pull-type lifts, especially with those who are self-coached or poorly coached.
Overhead presses and jerks be easily confused even though they use entirely different muscles. To the layman and novice trainees they are very similar but to insiders they are in fact very different.
Olympic lifters didn't always squat. They used to do all split lifts. So how much should your feet move? And which is better, the power jerk or the push jerk?
This video from world record holder Lu Xiaojun is an example of the strength and flexibility you'll find in world class athletes. It's smooth, effortless, and, we daresay, beautiful.
If you've ever attended or competing in an Olympic weightlifting meet, you've no doubt encountered the drama of the "press-out" call from the judges. Should the rules be relaxed or remain as they are?
In this video of a student's clean and jerk, a number of technical items can be observed. I had to evaluate them in order to make the adjustment for the call of the next weight.
Do you know how much heavier than your clean and jerk your back squat should be? And do you know why this is important? Let's look over the numbers so you can check your training plan.
We continue with our series teaching the six basic RKC exercises - this week we move onto one of the more complicated movements, the kettlebell clean. Are you doing it correctly?
An important ratio for a weightlifter to know is the ratio of the snatch to the clean and jerk. I'm going to tell you why it's important and how to make appropriate training adjustments.