competition training

Not everyone is rushing to get back to the gym.
Whether you are competing or working towards specific goals, you will always have a time that falls outside of your normal training cycles.
A training cycle, like a story, has a beginning, middle, and end, and each has elements that are necessary for it to work.
Take some time to see how training methods and philosophies play out over time, but always plan to reevaluate again and again.
Getting mad at the bar isn't just for the bros in the gym. It has an actual purpose related to your "arousal level."
By teaming up with others we can achieve our potential, learn from one another, and build upon the skills we share.
The rules are now set and lifters will just have to adjust to the new conditions as they always have.
A large percentage of the population sabotage themselves for fear of success, the fear of being good and some have just lost motivation.
It can be hard to accept, or incorporate, ideas from another area when your current group is grounded upon certain principles.
Competition, especially with oneself, is the epitome of motivation.
Releasing expectations for when each stair-step of measured progress will arrive makes them all that much sweeter.
A seasonal approach to your physical development allows you to peak when you need to peak, heal when you need to heal, and avoid burnout.
Complement your triathlon program with focus on posture, strength, and mobility.
My time on the bench has allowed me to reprioritize a few of my training goals.
What are the important differences in exercise selection between the front and back barbell squats, and when might one be more appropriate than the other.
Simply asking yourself “How strong is strong enough?” brings an awareness to your training that most athletes will never reach.
Take some time to step back and look at your life and your capability, and appreciate the beauty of how far you’ve come and the amazing things you can do.