mature athletes

Your mental climate during workouts is one of the most significant factors for success. Here's how to optimize it.
The body pursues different strategies for dealing with resistance exercise as we age, but that doesn't mean you can't get stronger.
My groin and elbow were much better this week. I'm starting to feel like I might have a fighting chance.
Specificity is both necessary and problematic. Not enough and you don’t make progress. Too much and you’ll fall prey to stagnation.
I'm just not able to get any quality work in, and fooling around in the gym with light weights is incredibly aggravating.
With these workouts from strength and conditioning coach Tom Kelso, aging can be an opportunity to get stronger than ever.
I often wonder: If my sole or primary objective was to feel as good as possible at age eighty, would I still lift as hard as I do?
“My trainer says that if you eat too much protein, it’ll turn to fat.” What's wrong with this statement?
The most remarkable thing about my workouts lately is that they’re not at all remarkable.
How do we put all health and fitness needs together for a middle-aged athlete who wants to be able to cope with most of what life throws at him?
My orthopedic health is holding up great, and I had another productive week of training.
My seventy-year-old client is quite special. She is also my mother and longest serving client, having been trained by me for more than twenty years now.
This week I had to work around some groin, neck, and wrist issues, but I was still able to train.
For the first time since starting the Matt Kroc deadlift cycle, I’m feeling confident that I’ll make it through the entire sixteen weeks.
The most successful people keep constant pressure on themselves. This is the price that must be paid for excellence.
The most important thing to realize is that though you may feel like a young you, your body has other ideas.
To be successful in lifting, you have to use the greatest amount of intensity that you can sustain long-term.