mature athletes

The most successful people keep constant pressure on themselves. This is the price that must be paid for excellence.
The most important thing to realize is that though you may feel like a young you, your body has other ideas.
To be successful in lifting, you have to use the greatest amount of intensity that you can sustain long-term.
Some days I feel confident and walk away from my training with a smile, and others are more of a challenge. The key is to keep my momentum.
Take a look at my training plan, and you'll notice I vary movements, sets, and reps throughout the week. Here's why.
I think every person on the planet has these masks wrong right now, including the company that makes and sells them.
Recently someone asked what I attribute to my lifting success as an older athlete. Here's my response.
I'm eighteen weeks out from the AAU Powerlifting World Championships. Here's my training plan.
I competed in the 2014 100% Raw! Federation’s American Challenge last weekend, and was happy with the results.
Pain and discomfort made my training difficult this week, but I managed to work around it.
My body was feeling good this week, and I planned my workouts carefully to get in as much volume as I could.
New studies are suggesting the numbers of repetitions per set matters much less than how hard you push yourself.
The PanAmerican Championships are right around the corner, so I am trying to get in more alone time in the gym.
Lately I’m focusing on work, rather than saving myself on my warm ups so that I can display my strength at the top set.
At 42, Cheryl Brost is signing with the San Francisco Fire, one of the premier teams in the National Pro Fitness League.
I set a new Canadian record at a recent meet, and plan to try for the world record in June.
Leaving my gym bag at home turned out to be a good mistake, as I set a new beltless deadlift record.