performance enhancing drugs

Believe it or not, beetroot could improve your athletic performance.
Image and performance enhancing drug (IPED) users are not athletes or competitive bodybuilders but casual users.
In an era of rampant doping, what would happen to the sport if drug tested resulted in a level playing field?
Media charades to discourage the use of performance-enhancing drugs caused more harm than good.
The conversation about performance-enhancing drug use in sport is riddled with truths and lies.
According to studies, three to four percent of high school pupils have tried some form of performance enhancing drug (PED).
As a female, I can't help but be fascinated by the images of women in the fitness world. For that reason, two particular articles made my picks this week, as well as five others you shouldn't miss.
When a recent article suggested xenon might produce similar effects to blood-doping, WADA suddenly weighed in. And a lot of people became suspicious of Russia topping the medal table at Sochi.
Since the earliest records there have always been people who pushed the boundaries and sought an edge. Cycling may have the worst reputation of all sports. But is it really the worst?
I recently spoke to MMA fighter Danielle “The Curse” West about her career and I wasn’t surprised to learn that one of the reasons she began fighting was because she wanted to help someone else.
I do not believe that every person in CrossFit is using steroids. The reason for this I hope can be explained in this article about natural hormone increases brought on by heavy resistance training.