scientific method

There is so much information on every aspect of fitness at our fingertips but that may not mean much if it doesn't get through.
Many things are based on opinion or belief—from religion to politics to daily habits to relationships. However, science is the one thing that should escape any form of bias.
It is easy to find research that will support, or that can be manipulated to support any ridiculous claim.
Training is one big experiment, and all good experiments follow the scientific method.
We're bombarded by information. So how do you sort out the good studies from the ones that don't really tell us anything?
New research examined how toe angle, range of motion, and rep schemes affect the quads.
For the most part, none of us are perfectly average. We need to design programs that are more individually focused.
Yoga fans believe the practice does the body good, but scientists decided to break down exactly how it improves your fitness. They looked at deadlift, cardio, flexibility, grip strength, and more.
Are kettlebells good or bad for your back? What muscles do they really work? Scientists put the kettlebell to the test. Read on to find the answers.