strength and conditioning

Tire smash: In order for hitting a tire with a hammer to be more than a novelty, it needs to be performed with power, precision, and fluidity.
Set-up, bracing, order of operations, and violence of action will all equally govern the success of this drill.
Sled drag is a full-body movement- brace up, drive power from your midline, and take short, hard steps. Soft equals sketchy, and, slow.
Pace does not change the range of motion or mechanics of movement. Breathe deliberately, hustle with quality, and finish quickly.
Fight for sound position, remember that efficiency and focus mitigate fatigue, and work hard.
Each sport has its own requirements for body composition, and that is what makes different sporting disciplines unique.
Tire flip: Mind position and execution, and move with power. Use assistance as needed, and stay aggressive- there is absolutely no value to a casual tire flip.
Strong set-up, specific timing, and non-casual application of power will make this drill.
If set requires interruption at chosen weight, make a minor adjust and complete next set uninterrupted.
Transition seamlessly from one movement to the next.
This is a sprint, not a jog, and should feature quality, furious-paced movement throughout. Neither fatigue nor pace should change range of motion in push-up- scale as needed.
No lazy hollow rock, no soft squats, no wiggly pull-up.
Focusing on sets and reps takes your attention away from what matters most when it comes to building size.
Pace is not a substitute for position, even in simple movements.
Accumulate lots of quality reps, and climb as heavy as desired once position and execution are sound.
Today, the 5th slam ball ends at chest-level and is propelled as far as possible (using an offset stance as in our medicine ball throw) and chased immediately.
There is just something utterly primal and enjoyable about strict pressing a big bell over your head.