warm-up

It's easy to place too much emphasis on soft-tissue and mobility work as a warm up prior to training - how much time are you wasting on a weekly basis?
With cold weather on its way, your warm up is about to become even more important.
You spend thirty minutes on your warm up but you're still not making any gains. What gives?
Staying in the game and injury-free past the age of forty takes extra time and planning.
Deadlifts are too important to mess up. Make sure you're ready to make the most of them with this dynamic warm up.
These four mobility sequences can be used as a warm up, a cool down, or a break from work.
Your energy could be put to better use by engaging in lifts that will actually make you a better weightlifter.
In a recent study, investigators wondered if warming the diaphragm up just like your other muscles would be of any benefit.
First, I’m going to tell you how a warm up should go. Then, I’m going to discuss all the factors you aren't considering that might have you get injured.
I used this last year to prepare for both my squat and deadlift workouts leading up to a world record squat.
Warm up may not the sexiest part of your day, but you know what else isn’t sexy? Being an immobile and injured ball of meat.
A good warm up will enable your body to get to its working heart rate quicker. Starting from cold means your body has to work anaerobically for longer.
These stretches will help lengthen and engage the major muscles before any intense session.
Don't ignore the lifts because you aren't able to reap the benefits right now. Use your warm up as a place to perfect your technique.
It appears that stretching before activity is not going to help prevent injuries. So what is the answer?
In this video, Ben Musholt demonstrates four alternative warm up exercises to the standard jumping jack or running in place motions.
A good warmup can improve your performance, but a bad one can make your it much worse. A recent study asks whether PNF stretching is a good idea before exercise.