deadlifting

Changing your thinking from "pull" to "push" can be the difference between a big lift and a no-lift.
Should you allow your lumbar spine to assume a flexed posture when deadlifting? I have the answer, and here is the scientific evidence.
A journey to big PBs isn't about the perfect program or expensive equipment - it's about consistency and effort.
There is no need to argue which deadlift stance is best - it is all about finding your mechanical power position.
This is not another fancy deadlift program. This is real world advice about what you need to get results.
Internet fitness is a bipolar beast - there are a lot of unqualified opinions flying around.
Since there are so many deadlift variations, it can be overwhelming to think about which one is the best one to train. In my mind, though, it is a rather easy question to answer.
I recently worked with a client who improved his deadlift by starting with the eccentric portion of the lift. A recent study supports this practice as well.
Here are the four rules for scaling all benchmark CrossFit WODs, plus specifics on how to scale "Diane" to where you are at as an athlete.
Conventional or sumo? Mixed grip or overhand grip? And what about hook grip? Or straps? So many questions about deadlift variations! Here are my answers to the most common deadlift dilemmas.
Powerlifters and Olympic lifters have used variations of their lifts to improve their specific weaknesses for decades. We can use the same strategy with the deadlift with these variations.
It can be advantageous to round your back when lifting heavy in your training. Because life doesn't always conveniently look like a barbell and sometimes we can't help but round our backs.
Maybe it sounds crazy, but new research shows a simple way to improve your sprinting times is to lift heavy ten minutes before you run. Not five, not twenty, but ten minutes before - and heavy!