depression

There are more important things than exercise we can do to bring awareness to a tragic death.
Being able to rip 400 pounds off the floor at any time has done more for my confidence than anything else.
Pain does not come simply from our habitual mechanics. Our mental habits can cause just as many problems.
The use of antidepressants is up 400% and Alzheimer’s disease costs the US $100 billion annually. Could it be our current recommended dietary guidelines are a contributing factor to this epidemic?
I see many athletes who start out eager and driven, but become disenchanted with the prospect of fitness and do just enough to get by. As coaches, it is our responsibility to notice this behavior.
For some people, the lack of sunlight during the fall and winter can lead to feeling seriously blue and even depressed. This is known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD).
There are times when my life is absolutely on point. This is not one of those. I’m not getting my training in, and I’m not going to anytime soon, at least not to the level I’m used to and prefer.
The change of season is beautiful, but it can be challenging on our mood and energy. Here are 8 tips I use to combat seasonal affective disorder, as autumn rolls in and sunshine disappears.
People talk about “exercise high,” but research recently published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry states exercise can actually be effective medication for clinical depression.