learning

It happens to all of us. We all have bad days in the gym. How do we deal with a bad training session? What makes training good or bad? Let's take a more detailed look.
To me the fistbump or handslap that begins a sparring session in BJJ means more than just, "I'm ready to begin." It signifies a pact between two teammates for a bigger goal.
If we agree that taking notes is a useful tool in the learning process, then how do we effectively take notes in a sweaty, crazy BJJ class? Here are my thoughts.
I've discovered training is much more enjoyable when I'm outdoors and when I'm learning new things. How do you keep challenging yourself, and are you still having fun?
Every Sunday we post the "Sunday Seven" so you can quickly see the 7 most popular articles of the week. This week: para-athlete Cleuton Nunes, recovery tips, handstand walking, and more!
Emily Kwok, Seymour Yang, Braulio Estima, the Miyao Brothers, Mackenzie Dern, and Alan Belcher give advice to beginner BJJ students. They share what they would have done differently in their training.
When I was 4 years old I could read at a 4th grade level, but I couldn’t tie my shoes so they weren’t going to let me into kindergarten. Find out what this has to do with your athletic performance.
Do you know someone who is just naturally good at something? They just get it? Well, that’s completely ridiculous, and today science is helping dispel the myth some people get something for nothing.
Getting started in BJJ is hard enough, but chances are you're also a bit of a social pariah around your academy. There's a reason for this, and there are also better and worse ways to get through it.
When you start to learn something, sometimes you get one part right and forget two others. It seems to take a while to come together. Why is this and what can we learn from how we learn?
In learning theory there's a concept known as "zone of proximal development." Understanding it can make a big difference in how effective your coaching is and how well your students learn.
I wrote recently on how I don't like to accept help, in or out of the gym. I thought about why and came up with 3 reasons. If we look at these, I bet we'll become better athletes (and people).
Sometimes I say no to help, when I really should say yes. I've thought about this in terms of athletics and realized it's held me back from both learning and forming personal bonds. Just say yes!
Are exercise and learning motor skills related? Is it best to learn new motor skills before or after exercise? Research shows exercise helps make new skills stick better in our brains.
I work hard at self-awareness. I find it to be helpful to my learning process as an athlete. I discovered I always follow the same 5 step process of breakdown and awareness. It's ugly, but it works.
I not only understand my patient's injuries because I'm a doctor, but also because I was once an injured athlete, too. It was that injury that actually inspired me to pursue my career.
Neil Peart, drummer for the rock band Rush, taught me something valuable about being a BJJ black belt. It's taken me a while to figure out how to explain it, but here you go.