macronutrients

Unless you're looking to beat Usain Bolt's record later this year, save yourself the stress of weighing and measuring.
It's time to dispel a lot of the media hype currently forming around protein.
New research has found individuals with more muscle mass do not need relatively more protein after resistance training.
If you are training to become a high-performance athlete, you had better be eating for it, too.
When it comes to function and physique, I’m not convinced the pros of flexible dieting outweigh the cons.
I believe many athletes can benefit from the inclusion of cheat meals as long as they are implemented strategically and with purpose.
If we changed dietary guidelines, educated the public, and lowered obesity numbers, many diseases of Western society would fall.
Flexible dieters don't just eat junk food and they can eat healthy. I'm here to bust the crazy Internet myths about IIFYM.
What should you eat in order to fuel your performance? While the answer depends on your sport and training, there are a few basics that all athletes should follow for the best possible results.
You can eat anything you want as long as it fits within your caloric budget and macronutrient split. Whether you get your carbs from donuts or oatmeal, you can still improve your body comp.
Are you confused about what to eat before and after a workout? Frustrated by what and when to eat? Read on for some best practices when it comes to fueling your body before and after training.
After last week when I wrote about how we're all eating too much protein, I kept digging further - this time it's about how to time your protein intake for best growth of lean muscle mass.