physical therapy

There's something simple that can help you perform better and feel better. And you should be accessing it before you get injured - not after.
Do you know why you're following the training program you are? Do you know what the why behind every exercise you're doing?
Plateaus can be challenging, especially if you feel you're doing everything right. If this is you, then I know exactly why it is you're stuck.
Are you simply repeating the words other coaches use or are you using your cues to address an athlete’s specific physiological challenges?
Trying to improve your basic squat? Trouble keeping your chest up or opening your hips? These drills can help you develop great squat form.
I have a confession to make: I don’t do a lot of mobility work. If your mobility work takes longer than your training, then the fact is you're doing both wrong.
The infamous “draw your belly button to your spine” cue. Not only is there no evidence to support it, but it does not lead to a stable spine.
What do an athlete and a 65-year old with a knee replacement have in common? A lot more than you think, from my perspective working in injury and surgery rehab.
How miserable it is not to be able to go to the gym, follow your training plan, or possibly even tie your shoes. How can you get back to feeling good and back to training?
Now that I've gotten back to strength training, I'm using pause reps to get the most out of my sessions.
As an orthopedic surgeon, I have been treating this problem with greater frequency, especially in the cross-training and CrossFit athletic communities.
In this video, Ben goes through three progressive, rotational movements to use with older clients.
In order to best help your clientele, it’s important for coaches to understand the muscles of the back, what can cause back pain, and treatments (after physical therapy, of course.)
Taking a page from Peyton Manning and several other colleagues here in Colorado who swear by the MAT results, I hired a practitioner to try it out myself.
The Rotater is an awesome product for shoulder stretching or strengthening for rehab. It works best for internal and external rotation. Something many of us are lacking.
While you may know cupping for the bruises it leaves, new methods involve movement while cups are applied. Called myofascial decompression, this treatment combines Eastern and Western knowledge.
Say hello to Super D! I'm going to tell you a little bit about myself and then show you all my favorite techniques for strengthening and mobilizing your shoulders.