plyometrics

Managing intensity and fatigue is the key to a well-rounded program.
Flexibility and leg strength are the keys to keeping your joints safe during landings of any sort.
Runners who perform plyometric exercises run faster and more economically than those who don’t.
Have you ever wanted to learn parkour? Let Al show you the best way to leap into this athletic practice with precision jumping!
Speed is highly sought after in the athletic world. So we must understand what methods are most efficient in developing it.
Depth jumps provide a great way to develop explosive strength and power, as well as start-stop speed, a need for most athletes.
The need to implement plyometrics into periodized training comes from the observation that there are a number of strong athletes who fail to transfer their strength into efficient movement.
A new study suggests leg strength carries over into plyometrics, particularly while doing drop jumps. Female rugby players could also sustain their jumps for a longer period of time.
For the past three months we’ve progressively prepared for the more intense work this month. It’s now time get serious about developing strength.
Working to develop explosive leg strength is the most surefire way to increase your jumping ability. Here are three skills derived from parkour that are also great for building explosive leg strength:
This month’s article deals with subtle changes to the off-season strength training program, mostly in the area of intensity. The bottom line remains the same: build a strong foundation.
Don’t let the winter cold stop your training, but rather, come into spring with a great base for the year. Use the winter as a training cycle and not a period of hibernation.
In this video, Ben demonstrates three lower body plyometric skills for explosive leg strength - the plyo step-up, the crane plyo, and the plant plyo.
Box jumps are a fascinating movement that can be an incredible display of athletic ability, but the rebound jump is a movement that should not be taken lightly.
Plyometric training is great, but is more always better? A new study shows higher volume plyometrics might not always be better than lower volume.
One day of rest between plyometric sessions is pretty standard advice. However, a new study suggests that for experienced athletes, it may not make a difference.
Plyometric training is practiced by many athletes to improve explosive power. A recent study explored the best surface and volume for maximum effectiveness.