volume

The off-season is a time ripe with opportunity for long-term gains and consistent personal bests.
When the balance between stimulus and recovery is lost, supersets can become an unnecessary danger.
Narrowing your training focus and mastering fundamental movements can lead to big progress.
I was fortunate to learn from Pavel himself about the Soviet secrets of dominance and longevity. Here is what I discovered.
You can save yourself years of pain by accepting that the rules of biology apply to you, and that education is your best friend.
It's time to understand the numbers. The key is to know what each is for and not to do more reps than you have to.
You have to do a certain amount of every lift to ensure strength and skill development. But how do you know which is weakest and how to adapt your training?
Many believe more is better, and so fail to experience what true, all-out effort entails when strength training.
You’ll be amazed at the difference this approach can make. You’ll be strong, fit, and recover from hard sessions almost instantly.
When repetitive stress is combined with poor stability, mobility, or movement patterns, then athletes are likely to breakdown.
Everyone knows typical gym training begins with three sets of ten. But what happens when you do ten sets of three? Give it a try for six weeks and see how fast you grow in size and strength.
This week I entered a high-volume phase in hopes I can maintain or increase maximal strength and also improve body composition.
An experienced colleague let me in on a little secret for creating world-class athletes: 2 x 7 x 52 x 10. In other words, turn up the volume. It works for beginners, too.
If you're not seeing gains from your training program, you might just need to amp up the volume a bit. Here's what a recent study found out about increasing training volume.
If, like many people, you’ve read "The 4-Hour Body," I have some bad news for you. If you’re after performance MED (Minimum Effective Dose) doesn’t work.
Is more actually better? Scientists studied Australian football players to determine if an increase in training volume would also result in an increase in performance.
Deployed soldiers who exercised three or more times per week reported their health improved during deployment. This info leads researchers to recommend a greater frequency of exercise.