The ultimate goal of any core exercise should be to protect your spine. Spinal stiffness and core stabilization strategies should also transfer directly into your bigger lifts. That’s why it’s important to implement specific core exercises that place a focus on the forces you want the spine to resist:

  • Anti-extension (excessive lumbar arching)
  • Anti-flexion (excessive trunk flexion and forward slouching)
  • Anti-rotation (avoiding a force that is trying to twist you to one side)
  • Anti-lateral flexion (excessive side-bending)


Core-strengthening exercises.

These exercises maintain the core heath you need to support athletic endeavors.


Athletic Endeavors Demand Core Strength and Power

Tell me the last time you saw someone pull 500lb off the floor who didn’t engage his or her core and trunk muscles. Or when was the last time you witnessed an athlete clean and jerk 300lbs without creating core tension?


These things do not exist.


It’s imperative to have effective core function during heavy lifting; however, you also need these fundamental training patterns imposed on your core and spine to meet the demands of various sports and athletic endeavors.


Consider a professional baseball player swinging a bat, a professional basketball player cutting through the lane, or a professional soccer player striking the ball. All of these athletes are generating power and strength through their core.


Add these four exercises to your training program to ensure that you’re creating a strong and powerful core from every angles and in all planes:


  • Plank Body-Saw (anti-extension)
  • McGill Side Bridge With Rotation (anti-lateral flexion, anti-rotation, and anti-extension)
  • Dead-Bug With Overhead Resistance (anti-extension)
  • One-Arm Suitcase Farmer’s Carry (anti-flexion, anti-rotation, and anti-lateral flexion)


Continue for Video Demonstration of the Plank Body Saw