In Phelps’ finale, he helped earn the U.S. gold in the swimming medley relay. The Americans trailed when Phelps dove in, but he pushed them into the lead. The U.S. finished with a time of 3:29.35, taking the gold. Japan touched in 3:31.26 to take the silver medal and Australia finished in 3:31.58 to take bronze. Phelps earned his 4th gold of the London games, as well as two silvers. Phelps ends his career with 22 overall medals, 18 of them gold.


The men weren’t the only ones who showed out in the medley relay. The U.S. women’s team set a world record on their way to gold in the event. The Americans finished with a time of 3:52.05, which beat China’s world record by 0.14 seconds. The 17-year-old Franklin, who starts her senior year in high school this fall, finished the meet with four golds and a bronze, while Schmitt leaves with three golds, silver and a bronze. Australia touched in 3:54.02 to take the silver medal and Japan finished in 3:55.73 to take bronze.


Serena Williams won her first singles gold in tennis in dominating fashion. Williams beat Russia’s Maria Sharapova 6-0, 6-1, to secure the most lopsided women’s final in Olympic history. Williams became the second woman in history to win the Golden Slam earning all four major titles in tennis this year. The career Golden Slam was first achieved by Steffi Graf, who did it when she won at the Olympics in 1988 after sweeping all four major titles. Serena is the first woman to ever win the Golden Slam in both singles and doubles. Serena and her sister Venus will try to earn the gold in doubles against the Czech Republic on Sunday.


After a stellar performance against Nigeria, the men’s basketball team followed it with a scare against Lithuania. The men managed to pull off the victory, with a score of 99-94. The U.S. was in trouble until LeBron James stepped up and took control. James scored 9 his 20 points in the final four minutes for the U.S. (4-0).


As expected, all five top contenders won their opening 100-meter heats on the track: Tyson Gay of the U.S., 2004 Olympic champion Justin Gatlin of the U.S., and Jamaica’s Usain Bolt, Asafa Powell, and Yohan Blake. It's worth noting that Bolt was the least impressive of that bunch, with a time of 10:09. Ryan Bailey of the U.S. actually came on the scene with the fastest heat time of 9.88.


The U.S. leads the way with 54 overall medals, and 26 golds. China is close behind with 53 total medals and 25 golds.


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