EDITOR'S NOTE: Mischele Stevens has been helping beginners fulfill their dream of completing a triathlon for the past decade. A former ironman athlete, Mischele has coached athletes to the World Championship level at both the 70.3 and full Ironman distance. In addition to her work with elite athletes, Mischele also coaches in a community-based program that helps hundreds of people of all levels complete triathlons each year. 


This programming has been designed for the beginner to train for a sprint distance triathlon, but anyone can use it.


There will be workouts that you will be asked you to record the time or distance. Do it! Recording your training sessions allows you to confirm that you are progressing. All workouts are expected to be done with a hard/fast effort unless stated otherwise. This means you will not enjoy it and will wish desperately for it to be over. This is how we get fitter and faster. Plus, if you are in a time crunch you can get a workout in without taking away from life.


You will plug the training week into your life and complete each workout according to your schedule. This allows you to swim when you can get to the pool or bike when you have more time, not because I said you have to do it on a certain day.


Please do not do the same sport two days in a row (example: swim on Monday and Tuesday). You can do more than one workout in a day, but need at least three hours between for recovery. There are six workouts in a week. Do not make up any you miss from previous weeks. You must take one whole day off in a week to rest and recover.


If you have additional questions about the program, please ask Mischele in our forums.


Workouts for Week 3

mischele stevens triathlon coach sprint tri swim bike run

mischele stevens triathlon coach sprint tri swim bike run


I’m so tired!

Feeling tired? Fatigue is a very common complaint and affects athletes of all ages, sizes and abilities.

Fatigue is a subjective condition in which a person feels tired before beginning an activity, lacks the energy to accomplish tasks requiring sustained effort and attention, and becomes unduly exhausted after normal activities.


It is important to remember that the human body requires 7-10 hours of sleep in each 24-hour period. When we don't have enough time, the first place we typically cut back is sleep time. If you are getting up early to exercise, or staying up late, it is important to adjust your sleep time accordingly. If continuous sleep is not possible, a 20- to 40-minute nap during the day may help.


An overlooked cause of fatigue in the athletic adult is overtraining. One of the hardest things for an athlete to do is rest. The mindset is to push harder to get stronger and faster. We forget that it is possible to get too much of a good thing, even exercise, and that rest is an important part of training. We need to have a balance between training and recovery.


If an imbalance occurs and is allowed to persist, overtraining results. Athletes, and those around them, will notice lingering fatigue, mood changes, irritability, altered sleep and persistent soreness. Performance in workouts or competition may deteriorate. Frequent respiratory illnesses or even an overuse injury may occur.


The cure for overtraining is rest. The more severe the problem, the more rest needed to fix it. This can be very difficult to do until illness or injury forces the rest to occur. Prevention can help the adult athlete avoid this problem.


Rest can be the time when no strenuous activity is performed; such as in sleep time or days off. It can also be more active and involve low-intensity exercise, allowing a small amount of increased blood flow to reach the muscles. Both types of rest allow recovery to occur. Recovery is what the body does during rest periods to repair the damage to muscle cells after strenuous activity. If the body is given enough rest to allow adequate recovery, the body will completely repair the broken-down muscle cells and even build them up a little stronger, resulting in a stronger and faster athlete.


There are many causes of fatigue in the athletic adult. It is important to listen to your body and heed your body's warning signs. It is also important to remember that unrelenting fatigue may be a sign of underlying illness, and you should consult with your physician if this occurs.