Hips don’t lie. Shakira definitely got it right with that line. Weak outer hips can lead to a lot of issues: knock-knees during squats, low back pain, and instability with multi-planar movements.


I started to notice myself that I was experiencing low back pain, which didn’t make any sense to me. However, like most things in life we tend to focus on what feels good. And it turns out I wasn’t challenging my body to move in ways that stressed different muscle groups. I realized I had let my outer hip muscles get weak compared to the rest of my trunk (low back, core, hip flexors). 


RELATED: Squats and Hip Dysfunction: 2 Common Problems and How to Fix Them


Pre-Squat Workout Strength and Mobility Work

Here is a quick segment to do before a squat workout or run that will begin to engage the outer hips and work on strengthening the abductors. Weak outer hips are a pretty common issue. Sitting at desk for long periods of time, just moving forward (hello runners), or even doing yoga, we don’t often work on hip abduction, and this can lead to a host of issues.


I love that each little tweak and tender spot is actually a gentle reminder from the body, calling to us, “Hey over here. What about me?” Through my yoga practice, I am able to dive in a bit deeper to answer that call.


This quick flow should answer your call to having a better squat.

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