kids fitness

Teach children weightlifting while they are in their early fearless stage and you will watch them become quickly accustomed to the lifts.
These days, kids are told that they are good enough no matter what. But they aren’t. Our kids are failing at school and failing at health and wellness.
It's all too easy to write the perfect session, only to wind up coaching kids who don't want to engage with your program today.
If your kids are stir crazy this summer, send them on an adventure with ogres, forest nymphs, and heavy rocks.
There is a silent plague striking kids today, and it's not obesity or diabetes. It's what I call "f-shoulders."
The idea of kids lifting weights makes a lot of people nervous, but when done right, it's effective and safe.
Looking back from my current stage of life, much has now changed for youth weightlifters.
The best way to improve a child's diet is to take it slow and make it fun. Here are three steps to get you started.
Here are a few tips to make fitness more enjoyable for kids, as taken from a Montessori education perspective.
If youth are not miniature adults, why do we continue to subject kids to a watered-down adult sports model?
For the young athlete between the ages of seven to twelve, coordination training should be the main ingredient in his or her development
While medical experts acknowledge that growing pains are real, there is much disagreement as to their actual cause.
We have to think about why we do things in order to do them most effectively and truly. We have to trust in our hearts and our passions.
This program is for developing movement in adolescents, first and foremost. Learning proper weight lifting will increase coordination and strength, and therefore create a better athlete in any sport.
Using your time and energy effectively as a youth sports coach is vital. Making sure you can communicate and deal with all of your players will make your efforts all that more effective.
While it's natural that a young athlete does not want to go to practice on occasion, it's a problem when the child rarely wants to go. Here's a look at why this happens and how it can be solved.
Youth soccer is firmly entrenched in American culture, whereas strength training is a bit controversial. A new study shows lifting weights makes kids better soccer players.