stretching

According to a new study, static stretching chronically weakened the muscles when performed both before and during exercise. However, it many well be the better choice for post-exercise.
Not only does yoga offer therapeutic benefits, but it can also offer you a challenging physical practice to ignite your nervous system and strengthen joint stability for other activities.
Flexibility is called by experts "the last frontier of human performance." And like any other aspect of performance, it takes time, practice, and discipline.
Studies have shown static stretching decreases performance in novice weightlifters, and now new research suggests it's also true for advanced athletes. What do you think?
Many of us internally rotate our arms all day long while we work. Sadly, this exact positioning is a set up for a shoulder impingement or rotator cuff or labrum tear down the road.
As an athlete, our activities are prone to causing tension in our lower backs. For relief from this pain and tension, do the following poses daily or at least after your workout.
Mobility work doesn't have to get all complicated. Here are 5 easy ways to add dimension to your mobility work and increase your body's abilities.
The newest study suggests pre-workout static stretching decreases performance in adolescents. So should you ditch it altogether, or does it still have a place in your warmup?
Most of us pay attention to posture in the gym, but not outside of it. But most of your day is spent outside the gym, so you're actually practicing and refining bad posture all the time.
Two new studies about static stretching say totally different things. One says it decreases strength for only 10 minutes, the other says 24 hours. Who is right and how can this happen?
Every Sunday we post the "Sunday Seven" so you can quickly see the 7 most popular articles of the week. This week: deadlift tips, stretching advice, Tabata workouts, protein, and more!
The fitness industry is filled with idiots, many of whom conduct confusing studies about stretching. The truth is most people need more of it, but they should do it like real athletes do.
This series of stretches relieves tension in the fingers, wrists, forearms, and elbows. Great for athletes, massage therapists, techies, bartenders, and people with carpal tunnel syndrome.
Passive stretching before a workout might seem like a good idea, but it actually makes you weaker - over 8% weaker on average, according to the research.
As we age, we lose mobility. Or at least most of us do - but we don't have to. Here are 3 approaches you can take to integrating mobility training and staying flexible.
Rest and recovery consists of a lot more than just not working out. There are better ways to rest and there are recovery tools you need to be implementing. These are the seven things I recommend.
Researchers look to debunk PNF stretching in a new study. First I'll explain what PNF is and how it works, but personally I've about had it with all the stretching controversy.