Win

Here is an analysis of the current world records across all age categories. I wanted to see how consistent percentages of snatch to clean and jerk were across weight and sex categories.
Part of my job as a weightlifting coach is to simplify the complexities of the sport, and provide you with a framework of concepts from which you can hang your lifts and experiences.
The clean ends with the bar racked on your shoulders, whereas the jerk starts from there. Even so, many lifters find the need to readjust the position of their rack. Why is this?
If I had a pound for every time I’m asked about Olympic weightlifting shoes, well, I’d be able to afford plenty more pairs of shoes. Here's everything you need to know about weightlifting shoes
Last week we talked about the snatch grip width, so naturally this week we are going to move on to the clean and jerk.
Is the Outlaw Olympic Lifting Specialty Camp worth the time and money? Without a doubt, and here's why.
One question that most people have when they first start to learn the snatch is, "How wide should the grip be?" Here are the differences between the grips and how to determine the best width for you.
Just as in the clean, we now have another opportunity to take advantage of the springiness of the bar in order to complete the lift. Here's how you do it.
Bodybuilding has been looked at as the redheaded stepchild in terms of a training modality, but in truth it can be a potent modality to complement and aid in the development of the weightlifter.
Strongman-strong is a special kind of strong. We can learn a lot from taking a look at the basic principles of this training - whether you aim to be a strongman or simply a strong man.
This is about one of the tricks of the trade used by elite lifters that might be of use to those of you cleaning substantial weight in the squat style. This technique is called "catching the bounce."
Weightlifting is often misunderstood by the general public and, sadly, by people in other sports as well. Here are the top ten biggest myths about weightlifting, and why they're totally untrue.
We've learned to relax and center ourselves. Now it's right before the lift and it's time to charge ourselves up. There is a right and a wrong way to do this, and a right and a wrong amount to do.
I often run across coaches who slap together training programs with no thought to the issue of exercise sequence and the results can be damaging, especially with new lifters.
At times during my active weightlifting career I was asked why I competed. What could I possibly get out of it? I got something people who are afraid to compete will never ever have in their lives.
As with my discussion last week about the press-jerk confusion there is also much of the same with the pull-type lifts, especially with those who are self-coached or poorly coached.
Overhead presses and jerks be easily confused even though they use entirely different muscles. To the layman and novice trainees they are very similar but to insiders they are in fact very different.