icing

Dr. Gabe Mirkin has updated his recommendations for injured athletes.
Nobody wants to take three cold showers a day, but ice therapy is more convenient for regular use. A recent study shows icing has mixed benefit for performance and pain.
I've agreed to compete in my first fitness competition in the bikini division. I've also started taking regular ice baths. No, I'm not trying to torture myself, it's all part of a bigger plan.
The sacred cow of injury recovery has been slain: icing is no longer good for you. It might even be bad for you. At best it might do nothing for you. Read all the new research to decide for yourself.
A new study finds a correlation between core temperature and fatigue onset during resistance exercise. The practice of cooling or icing your palms may actually help you lift more and perform better.
Everyone always tells you to ice an injury. It is generally thought that topical cooling has positive effects. However, new evidence has been presented that suggests this just may not be true.
It's important to work hard, but giving your body a break is also a crucial part of building strength and endurance. These seven articles will help you.
“My shoulder is really sore, I think it might be injured, what should I do?" Here's how to approach healing an injury - the 4 modalities I recommend, plus ICE and REST!