Bob Takano

Bob Takano

 

 

 

All Articles By Bob Takano

For decades I’ve been hearing the complaints about technique coaching and training the snatch and clean and jerk. Here's why you need technique and there's no excuse for skipping over it.
Even when you miss a lift at one weight, it doesn't always mean you're not capable of doing more. The key is knowing when to make that call. Here's what happened when one of my lifters did just that.
As Olympic weightlifting becomes more popular, you might want to seek out a specialized coach. But how do you pick a good coach? What should you look for? Here are some tips.
If you are a coach you need to be able to detect subtle actions in your student's lifts. Watch both of these videos and see if you can notice the difference.
As a coach, it's great to see progress in your students. Here is a video of one of my lifter's first lessons, compared with a meet three weeks later.
Even if you just started lifting, you can probably tell that small tweaks in your technique make all the difference. This week we compare a failed snatch with a successful one.
Former bodybuilders who are new to Olympic weightlifting demonstrate similar movement patterns. It may take a while to change these patterns, but it can be done.
Do you know how much heavier than your clean and jerk your back squat should be? And do you know why this is important? Let's look over the numbers so you can check your training plan.
Former U.S. National Team member Emmy Vargas performs a proper snatch extension. This a great movement to develop power and technique.
Although many lifters would love to have the technical proficiency demonstrated in this lift, I found a couple of points that could make it even better next time around.
The shift from the pull to the knees to the power position is one of the most difficult aspects of coaching technique. Here's a simple exercise to teach the feeling of this movement.
An important ratio for a weightlifter to know is the ratio of the snatch to the clean and jerk. I'm going to tell you why it's important and how to make appropriate training adjustments.