learning

Wondering if what you're doing is worth your time, effort, and money? Use this chart to assess the value of any exercise you may encounter.
Having studied boxing and the martial arts for many years as both student and teacher, I have come to accept that to fight is to face uncertainty and paradox.
We have to think about why we do things in order to do them most effectively and truly. We have to trust in our hearts and our passions.
While we may indeed learn through failure, we can also learn through our successes. In a recent paper, some scientists examined exactly how.
Here are six reasons why I believe it is important to learn to fail in order to take it back full circle to success, and develop as a lifter in the most successful manner.
Consider who you really are. If you are training as a paid athlete, you take risks - you are expected to. If you're the average person, you should be contemplating the cost-benefit of your training.
Olympians are glorified and their success is celebrated worldwide. But at what cost? And what does it have to do with each of us and the time we spend in the gym?
Could it be the word courage invokes an ancient energy of which everybody has a somatic awareness that transcends levels of experience and structural patterns of posture and movement?
In my eyes, having a yoga practice is more about how we live our life. It is a sacred time and opportunity to work in magical ways to rise up and become more than our stories of misfortune.
Through my time as both a strength athlete and strength coach, I’ve discovered some very effective aspects of training that, for whatever reason, have not hit most people’s radars yet.
The weight room is my laboratory. I am always experimenting, mostly on myself, but sometimes on my clients. And the weight room is my classroom. It is a place where I never stop learning.
This is who we are and what we aim to achieve. These are our values, and why we value you. This is what Breaking Muscle is all about.
We’re going to look at motor unit recruitment, proprioception, and the central nervous system and how using complexes trains each of these to make us better lifters.
A few years ago I made a big mistake. I got a lot of attention, but at a big expense. And it was the Incredible Hulk Sean Waxman who helped set me straight.
The biggest problem I find with coaching is that my explanation of the movement is too advanced for the client.
You should question everything - YouTube videos, fitness articles, and even your coach’s advice. Most of the content on the web is trying to get it right, but there is a lot of bad info out there.
Over-coaching is the use of excessive input by the coach in any given situation. The input becomes detrimental to the athlete’s development. Here are six ways you might not realize you're doing it.