sports psychology

Here are three keys I've found absolutely critical to creating the life I want. And yes, I learned them in yoga class.
We now come to a point in competition just before the lifter is to lift the barbell. So what happens at this point? He or she goes into a light trance. Yes, a trance - a weightlifter's trance.
After you relax, center your mind, visualize the lift, ground your body, and charge up your lungs, you are ready to lift. During that lift you have one other process to consider - discharging.
We've learned to relax and center ourselves. Now it's right before the lift and it's time to charge ourselves up. There is a right and a wrong way to do this, and a right and a wrong amount to do.
This week we look at the art of psyching up. What is it, what does it do, and how do YOU do it effectively to make those big lifts.
Mental imagery can be a powerful tool for achieving your goals. Here are six lessons on improving your performance through visualization.
It is important to know that you give your inner voice power. Just as you can think negative thoughts about your performance, you can transform your thoughts into positive, productive ones.
I remember my first tournament back in my amateur boxing days. I was eleven at the time. During the round I couldn't hear the crowd. What is this sensation and how does it help us as athletes?
How does a pessimistic or catastrophic thinker become a positive go-getter? Here are some ways to change your perspective, whether you are an athlete or not.
I have always thought that you lift as you live (and think). In the weeks to come I will put that into the context of your progress through not only your sports but perhaps of life itself.
The best way to develop toughness is to realize it’s not an overnight process. Learning to embrace the suck when everything in your body is screaming to slow down is not a quick skill to learn.
I like Justin Timberlake. You do too. Admit it. While listening to his newest song, I’ve been thinking about mirrors, both actual ones and how people can be mirrors for us, in training and in life.
The mind is weaker than the body; so just imagine what the body could do with the right mindset. Fears and self-doubt can stop an athlete in his or her tracks long before the body quits.
I f*ck up. And sometimes when I f*ck up I am unable to maintain perspective. I denigrate myself and grow my mistakes in my mind to be so big that they displace all the good things I am and have done.
People always look for the easy way out. If you are this person don’t even bother showing up to ask me or any other trainer the question, “How do I get results?”
You can improve your performance by improving your visualization skills. And if you've never done visualization, I'm going to walk you through how to do it, step by step.
Many of us have superstitions about our training. We have our own habits and rituals at the gym, studio, and out on the field of play. But do these habits make a difference?