autism

I don't do CrossFit so I can make it to the Games or come first in the class. I do it because it helps me with life.
Raising a son who has autism and dealing with a shoulder injury taught me CrossFit isn't just about presses and kipping pull ups.
When Ricardo's son Renzo was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, the family switched to eating gluten and casein free - but they all still train jiu jitsu.
Just like any other athletes, autistic individuals have unique strengths and weaknesses. A recent study suggests strength training may be particularly beneficial for children with autism.
Much has been made of late of the power of exercise to increase cognitive ability. Researchers proved this again by increasing cognitive ability in patients with autism, Down's, and Prader-Willi.
When coaching clients with autism, understanding cognitive and adaptive learning patterns is essential. And, it turns out it helps just about any rebellious client...and we've all had those!
Eric Chessen writes about the challenges of working with clients with autism - and, surprisingly, how the same tools he uses can apply to to any training client, child or adult, autistic or not.