bodybuilding

Between the CrossFit Open and the Arnold Classic, the last two weeks have been amazing reminders of why I started training in the first place.
It's an athlete's nature to never be satisfied, and that's okay. But sometimes we need to take a step back and evaluate how we gauge success and failure.
It’s easy to get weighed down in the trap of defining our successes by comparison to others. But what's even more important are the small, everyday self-victories.
Does your training bring you joy? I’ve tossed this question back and forth a lot in my own mind lately, ever since my dad asked me this several months back. And now I think I know the answer.
I celebrated Christmas with the 12 Days of Christmas WOD and rang in the New Year with a solid nine hours of sleep and 10lb clean PR. People might think I'm weird, but I've learned that's okay.
I've learned that confidence is key during holiday time. The most important thing during the holiday is to celebrate the way you want to, whether that means training or taking a break.
I’ve been thinking a lot lately about staying where things are safe - in love, in life, and in fitness. Change is hard, but embracing it can take you places you never thought you could go.
It aggravates me when people base the “success” of their life on the successes of others, and yet I’m guilty myself of being far too concerned with what others think of me and my progress.
Tough situations can kill us, or they can be our greatest gift. The choice is yours - it’s how you view it. This principle applies to training and life.
This week a woman at my box made it into the 100+lb snatch club before I did. I'm going to spend my time and energy working, not envying, so I can get there too.
This week I got to thinking about why we put ourselves through the anxiety and fear we experience during competition. Here are some of my personal reasons.
Bodybuilding has been looked at as the redheaded stepchild in terms of a training modality, but in truth it can be a potent modality to complement and aid in the development of the weightlifter.
In the past, competing in figure has injured me, mentally. Right now my focus is preventing that from happening again, and here's how I'm doing that.
This past weekend I competed at 2013 IFBB North Americans. I went in with a full heart and a whole lot of hope. I felt my best. I felt I looked my best. But then I was third callout.
Every Sunday we post the "Sunday Seven" so you can quickly see the 7 most popular articles of the week. This week: pull ups, the athlete's manifesto, the adrenal system, and more!
This is my first journal entry and I'm also 11 days out from the IFBB North American Championships. In the bodybuilding world, I'm a bit of a two-legged unicorn and here's why.
When I found CrossFit in 2010 it was exactly what I needed, having only a year of sobriety under my belt. But before long I ventured on to my next challenge - competing in a physique competition.