failure

Just as metal gets stronger when heated and hammered, we can get stronger when we train with pressure.
These pieces have caught your attention throughout the week. So here they are in one place for you to consume, digest, and enjoy.
Have you ever why so many athletes "forget" how to successfully complete a movement they've done hundreds of times?
Trying to fix your motivation by attempting to go even harder is a long-term recipe for injury or burnout. So what's the answer?
This week's collection addresses topics relevant not just for athletes, but for all of us who live in a world with both failure and success.
We have to think about why we do things in order to do them most effectively and truly. We have to trust in our hearts and our passions.
While we may indeed learn through failure, we can also learn through our successes. In a recent paper, some scientists examined exactly how.
Here are six reasons why I believe it is important to learn to fail in order to take it back full circle to success, and develop as a lifter in the most successful manner.
It's an athlete's nature to never be satisfied, and that's okay. But sometimes we need to take a step back and evaluate how we gauge success and failure.
Olympians are glorified and their success is celebrated worldwide. But at what cost? And what does it have to do with each of us and the time we spend in the gym?
In my eyes, having a yoga practice is more about how we live our life. It is a sacred time and opportunity to work in magical ways to rise up and become more than our stories of misfortune.
While we all might like to avoid getting hit, it turns out the best way to learn that is to practice getting hit. Taking a hit, metaphorically and physically, provides a big lesson for us.
Fitness goals can be quite oddball and they can take a very long time and a lot of energy to accomplish. Without a willingness to endure failure you'll never reach your goals.