Dresdin Archibald

Dresdin Archibald

 

All Articles By Dresdin Archibald

In any kind of weight training there are three vital contact points: the floor, the barbell, and the body. The relationships between these points define your ability to transfer force.
We are often told that we should learn from our mistakes. But how do we analyze our winning performances and what do we learn from them?
You might think accounting and weightlifting have nothing in common, but they both come down to numbers. If you aren't analyzing all your training numbers, you're wasting time and energy.
There are three main ways to deal with pre-competition anxiety - damping it down, thinking about other things, and finally thinking about THE thing. Let's look at them closer.
Does the old adage "No pain, no gain" have any validity? The answer is that it depends. It really depends on the type of pain and the type of gain you are talking about.
Getting mad at the bar isn't just for the bros in the gym. It has an actual purpose related to your "arousal level." Some sports require a higher level for optimum performance. Here's an explanation.
Maybe you hit all your lifts in the gym, but when you get on the platform at the meet everything seems to go wrong. Why is this and what can you do to overcome this performance anxiety?
People say weight lifting doesn't help you get better at sport, or that it will make you muscle-bound, or any number of things. Why do people resist the practice of weight training so much?
If you've ever attended or competing in an Olympic weightlifting meet, you've no doubt encountered the drama of the "press-out" call from the judges. Should the rules be relaxed or remain as they are?
The observance of the MLK holiday got me thinking about the history and future of black athletes in the sport of Olympic weightlifting. While small in number, they have been great in impact.
Women have been competing in weightlifting on the international level for 25 years now. How have things developed in that time? And where will another 25 years take women in this sport?
Getting young people involved in weightlifting is a challenge for many reasons. Is it possible to combat these reasons or is it just part of our culture that weightlifting will remain a niche sport?