Teaching

As a lifelong follower of weightlifting, I can say interest in the sport is at an all-time high. So there will continue to be a need for competent instruction.
Could it be the word courage invokes an ancient energy of which everybody has a somatic awareness that transcends levels of experience and structural patterns of posture and movement?
My Facebook wall has lit up with criticism over lululemon athletica's founder Chip Wilson's comments about the company's trademark luon pants not being suitable for every size and shape.
The biggest problem I find with coaching is that my explanation of the movement is too advanced for the client.
Over-coaching is the use of excessive input by the coach in any given situation. The input becomes detrimental to the athlete’s development. Here are six ways you might not realize you're doing it.
Managing a classroom, be it in a school or a gym, is more than just teaching the material. There are other variables to consider, and other questions for new coaches in particular to ask themselves.
Since the use of analogy is ubiquitous in the human experience, it makes sense to consider how best to maximize their power in our teaching and coaching. Read on for a few suggestions:
In this country we have a prolonged history of ignoring the science involved in physical training. The end results of training can be glamorous, but the real skill is in the structure and planning.
One of the biggest elements separating good coaching from adequate is the instructor’s ability to communicate. A ‘difficult’ student is a quick and clear litmus test for a coach’s ability.
As a full-time fitness coach, it has been my experience there are three components to good coaching – technical knowledge, the ability to manage a group, and communication skills.