carbohydrates

Mitochondria production plays a crucial role in athletic performance. A recent study explores the relation between heat, carb intake, and mitochondrial activity.
Bioenergetics by definition means the flow of energy in a biological system. In the human body it refers primarily to the conversion of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats into usable energy.
We’ve developed elaborate ways to ensure we have produce ripe for us whenever we want it. But, when you think about it, we actually had almost everything we needed before our food was so globalized.
We tend to think of the effect of carbohydrates on energy levels, but what about the nervous system? A new study suggests carb consumption might affect performance in highly technical sports.
Do you ever exercise for one, two, or even three hours at a time? If so, a recent study suggests you can benefit from drinking carbohydrate while you exercise.
What should you eat in order to fuel your performance? While the answer depends on your sport and training, there are a few basics that all athletes should follow for the best possible results.
You can eat anything you want as long as it fits within your caloric budget and macronutrient split. Whether you get your carbs from donuts or oatmeal, you can still improve your body comp.
We know fiber is good for us, but what about other indigestible carbs? Science looked at barley kernels and discovered some amazing properties when it comes to our health.
Do you really need both carbs and protein in your workout drink? Or does drinking protein during a workout actually tax energy from your body? Science takes a look at workout drinks.
Eating fruit provides beneficial nutrients, but eating fruit can also increase the amount of dangerous sugar in a diabetic's diet. Science looked at what happens when diabetics eat more or less fruit.
Metabolic flexibility is our body's ability to burn either carbs or fat for fuel. High carb diets and high insulin can lead to metabolic inflexibility, which means metabolic diseases like diabetes.
Most research on nutrition is done with the participants in a fasted state. A new review looked at research conducted on more "real life" situations to determine the necessity of post-workout carbs.
Turns out you may not need those post-workout carbs. New research shows no difference in protein absorption between those who consumed protein and those who combined carbs and protein.
Are you confused about what to eat before and after a workout? Frustrated by what and when to eat? Read on for some best practices when it comes to fueling your body before and after training.